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Alzheimer’s and the Summer Solstice

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month, a time when we show support for those suffering with dementia. While the awareness is spread over the entire month there is a special emphasis on June 20th . . . that’s right, the summer solstice, the longest day of the year. That’s been tagged as, “the day with the most light is the day we fight.”

We all know someone who has fought the debilitating effects of Alzheimer’s but many of us don’t know very much about this terrible disease. Although everyone’s brain changes as they age, it’s important to understand that Alzheimer’s disease is not a normal part of aging. Memory loss is typically one of the first warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease, but occasionally forgetting words or names does not mean a person has Alzheimer’s. There are other signs that someone in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease may experience in addition to memory problems.

In the early stages of the disease, these can include:

  • Getting lost in familiar places
  • Having trouble handling money and paying bills
  • Repeating questions
  • Taking longer to complete normal daily tasks
  • Displaying poor judgment
  • Losing things or misplacing them in odd places
  • Displaying mood and personality changes


Early diagnosis is important to helping people deal with this disease. Many aspects of Alzheimer’s are not known or misunderstood. Here’s some things you may not know about Alzheimer’s:

  • Many Seniors Living With Alzheimer’s Do Not Know They Have It – the early signs of dementia include problems speaking or finding the right words during conversations, behavioral changes and difficulty with daily tasks like dressing. However according to the Alzheimer’s Association, even after these symptoms are recognized by a health professional, only 45% of patients are told by their doctors of their diagnosis. The failure to disclose the diagnosis to patients and their caregivers can prevent seniors from receiving the early treatment they need.
  • Dementia Impacts More People Ever Year – It is estimated that around 44 million people in the world are currently living with dementia. While this is already a high number, it’s supposed to continue to increase over the years, rising to 135 million people by 2050.
  • Alzheimer’s Often Leads To Premature Death – Many people know that Alzheimer’s disease causes debilitating memory loss that can make daily tasks difficult. However, it’s essential that individuals are aware that Alzheimer’s is actually the sixth leading cause of death among the U.S. population, explained the Alzheimer’s Association. As there is currently no cure for dementia, the disease is the only illness in the country’s top 10 causes of death that can’t be prevented.


I didn’t realize the lack of awareness and diagnosis of this disease or the number of people it affects. I did know that there is no cure. Alzheimer’s is complicated. I remember something that was said during a conference I attended. They said, referring to Alzheimer’s, “Once you’ve seen one person with Alzheimer’s you’ve seen one person with Alzheimer’s.” It is a very complex disease and the search for a cure continues.

There is always the question of when it’s appropriate to have a dementia evaluation. It’s time to consult a doctor when memory lapses become frequent enough or sufficiently noticeable to concern you or a family member. If you get to that point, make an appointment as soon as possible to talk with a primary physician to have a thorough physical examination. Your doctor can assess your personal risk factors, evaluate your symptoms, eliminate reversible causes of memory loss, and help obtain appropriate care. Early diagnosis can treat reversible causes of memory loss, or improve the quality of life in patients with Alzheimer’s or other types of dementia.

You might consider having your loved one screened for dementia if they have begun having difficulty with the following:

  • Remembering new things
  • Dealing with numbers and logical thinking
  • Performing familiar activities
  • Understanding the passage of time: change of months/seasons
  • Changes in vision or perception
  • Carrying on a conversation
  • Losing things
  • Poor decision making
  • Socializing/ hobbies
  • Drastic change in personality or mood


As I’ve worked over the years with national Alzheimer’s organizations, I’ve seen their perseverance and commitment. This month gives us a chance to give of ourselves in the fight to find a cure. June 20th, the longest day, offers us three ways to give of ourselves – donate, fund raise, or volunteer. Click here to get ideas on how you can more effectively help in one of the three areas.

Alzheimer’s can rob us of experiencing some of the greatest joys of our life. Science continues to make strides in understanding how this disease works. We need to help support this work. While we will most certainly be working for those who are experiencing dementia, we may also be working to change our own lives, as many of us will face the life changing effects of Alzheimer’s in the future.

Best, Thair



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