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The COVID-19 Virus – Our Government’s Response

Here we are, hunkered down and wondering when, or if, we’ll be back to normal. It is a strange juxtaposition we are involved in . . . a national disaster that, in the past, has brought us together now forces us apart. I hate that we can’t gather our families together to weather this storm, but it is best, especially for us older folk, to stay isolated and wait for the “all clear” message. I’ve included some links below that will give you access to health and financial information concerning the COVID-19 pandemic. Here are a few updates on how our government is working to help out and guide us.

The 2 trillion-dollar stimulus legislation has been signed by the President. It contains a multitude of economic fixes. I will highlight a few of what is in the bill and a few things that were left out:

  • The bill allows us to have the medicine we need while we are quarantined (see my last blog) by allowing doctors to prescribe up to 90-day prescriptions without any restrictions by pharmacies or insurance providers.
  • The bill also includes provisions to expand telehealth, a great idea to get help from a health care provider without leaving the safety of your house.
  • Any costs related to getting tested for COVID-19 will be done with no costs to the patient.
  • We will be getting as much as $1,200 in a one-time check. It will be based on our 2018 Adjusted Gross Income. If you made too much money in 2018 your check could be reduced or eliminated.
  • Some changes affect your retirement funds. Talk to your financial advisor to see if any of the changes will help you.

One thing that wasn’t included in the bill was the ability to have some Medicare Part B drugs, primarily those that were injectable or infused, be provided in the home if the patient and physician think that’s the best option. It would have allowed much safer access to these life altering and life saving drugs. Many organizations fought for this change, but it wasn’t included. We hope that some later legislation will recognize the importance of this provision.

Another change that might help is the IRS has delayed when you need to file your 2019 taxes. Both the filing date and, more importantly, when any taxes you might owe are due has been extended to July 15th. Click on the IRS link below to get more information.

While the just passed legislation dealt with the immediate financial problems of those that were suddenly laid off and small and large businesses that were impacted by the pandemic, I want to remind our government that many seniors will also be affected financially. As we saw in the great recession, many older Americans found that they were the ones that rescued their children by letting them move back in with them or offering free childcare as their kids weathered the recession. We all know that we will do anything for our kids, but we’re older now and our retirement funds have been decimated. I’ll work to keep Washington apprised as this pandemic and its effects on the economy plays out, making sure they know how it affects the seniors in our country.

In the meantime, stay safe and stay involved, our country needs your steady spirit as we work to weather this storm.

Thair

HELPFUL LINKS

SENIORS

The CDC has guidance for older Americans on COVID-19 which can be found here.

For questions about receiving Social Security benefits during the COVID-19 national emergency, visit the SSA’s updates and frequently asked questions page here. If you need to get in touch with your local Social Security Office, use the office locator here to find their phone number.

Mental Health and Other Wellness Resources

The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) has a resource guide on dealing with anxiety related to COVID-19 and some frequently asked questions, which can be found here.

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is free, confidential, and available 24/7 at 800-273-8255.

The National Domestic Violence Hotline has resources and recommendations for staying safe during COVID-19, which can be found here. If you or a friend needs help, call the hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE(7233).

VETERANS

Updated information on COVID-19 from the Department of Veterans Affairs can be found here.

What should veterans do if they think they have COVID-19?

Before visiting local VA medical facilities, community providers, urgent care centers, or emergency departments in their communities, veterans experiencing COVID-19 symptoms—such as fever, cough, and shortness of breath—are encouraged to call their VA medical facility or call MyVA311 (844-698-2311, press #3 to be connected). Veterans can also send secure messages to their health care providers via MyhealtheVet, VA’s online patient portal. VA clinicians will evaluate veterans’ symptoms and direct them to the most appropriate providers for further evaluation and treatment. This may include referral to state or local health departments for COVID-19 testing.

What about routine appointments and previously scheduled procedures?

VA is encouraging all veterans to call their VA facility before seeking any care—even previously scheduled medical visits, mental health appointments, or surgical procedures. Veterans can also send secure messages to their health care providers via MyhealtheVet and find out whether they should still come in for their scheduled appointments. VA providers may arrange to convert appointments to video visits, where possible.

Can visitors still access VA medical facilities?

Many VA medical facilities have cancelled public events for the time being, and VA is urging all visitors who do not feel well to postpone their visits to local VA medical facilities. Facilities have also been directed to limit the number of entrances through which visitors can enter. Upon arrival, all patients, visitors, and employees will be screened for COVID-19 symptoms and possible exposure.

IRS

The IRS has established an updated resource section on steps to help taxpayers, businesses, and others affected by the coronavirus, which can be found here.