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Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month

Last month, June, was Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month – you may have seen some information about it on social media. I wanted to add to those voices before everyone moved on.

Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia, accounting for 60 to 80% of dementia cases, it affects over 5.5 million Americans. Alzheimer’s is one of those diseases that is all to common, most of us either have someone close to us with the disease or know someone whose loved one has Alzheimer’s. It has a huge affect on our nation because it requires caregivers with enormous patience, it lasts a long time, has no cure and is one of the nation’s costliest diseases. It is estimated that it will cost our nation over 300 billion dollars this year and the cost is going up. This cost doesn’t even figure in the cost to society of unpaid caregivers. While the death rate of other diseases has fallen . . . the death rate of heart disease, the most common cause of death, has fallen 11% . . . the death rate from Alzheimer’s has risen 123% between 2000 and 2015. Alzheimer’s impacts us all, personally and financially.

So, you might ask, “why haven’t we found a cure? It is obvious that we should be working day and night on a cure for this disease.” Well, we have, but it has been rough going. Alzheimer’s is a complicated and multifaceted disease. There have been many promising medicines that have been tested and failed, some of the failures coming at the very end of the clinical trials. It has been heartbreaking to those impacted by Alzheimer’s to have hope and then be disappointed.

Scientists have identified that plaque buildup in the brain seems to be common in those with Alzheimer’s. They have also discovered that a vital brain cell transport system collapses when a certain protein twists into microscopic fibers called tangles. These discoveries have given hints to the cause, but a solution has been elusive. While there have been medicines created that treat some of the symptoms, there is still no cure. But there is hope. Scientists have joined forces by forming the Coalition Against Major Diseases (CAMD), an alliance of pharmaceutical companies, nonprofit foundations and government advisers, that have forged a first-of-its-kind partnership to share data from Alzheimer’s clinical trials. It will take a combined effort like this to tackle this terrible disease.

As a country we need to ensure that our government allows coalitions like this the freedom to pursue a cure for Alzheimer’s. My math says an Alzheimer’s cure could save our nation 3 trillion dollars over 10 years, to say nothing of the impact on the millions of patients and caregivers whose lives are devastated by this disease.

In these times of isolation my sincere thanks goes to those in the Alzheimer’s units throughout the country who have stayed on the front lines, often at the risk of their own health, to care for the millions of Alzheimer’s patients. Find out more about Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month by going to this website. You might also try wearing a nice-looking purple outfit in hopes that someone will ask you about it and you can tell them about Alzheimer’s and the importance of finding a cure.

In the meantime, stay safe and be joyful.

Thair