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A Birthday Check List

It’s the end of the summer and for me that means another birthday. In fact, my birthday is today. As I was musing about how old I’ve become I thought there had to be something productive I could do other than wish I was younger. And, as you might have guessed, I thought that maybe a birthday was a good time to do some things that will help us stay healthy and happy and might make a for a helpful blog. We all know to change the batteries in our smoke detectors when we change the clock to, or back from, Daylight Saving Time. It’s a great way to keep our houses safe. So why not use our birthday as a reminder to do some other things that not only keeps us safe and healthy but also maybe a little bit richer. You might have some more things to add to the list, I’m always open to comments with suggestions. Here’s my list . . .

Get your yearly physical – This reminder is almost as common as the smoke detector batteries, but I think it might be the most important item on the list. Many of us have been self-quarantining, which has kept us away from the doctor’s office. I just got my physical and our care givers are really good at keeping us safe. They take everyone’s temperature, we go through a check list to see if we might be a COVID-19 risk, and everyone wears a mask and makes sure we are wearing ours. They clean everything between patients. I felt safe wherever I went. Getting a yearly physical exam is the best thing we can do for our long-term health.

Review your immunization needs – Part of our yearly physical should include gathering and reviewing our immunization records and finding out what immunizations we might still need. Click here to go to my recent blog about immunizations. It has links to some great sites to help you determine what vaccines you need. If you don’t have your immunization records, request them when you visit the doctor. Many doctors’ offices have online portals that give you access to your health records. One way or another, get a copy and keep it in a safe place.

Review your Medicare Part D drug coverage – While your birthday may not coincide with the Part D annual enrollment period (October 15 to December 7), your birthday is not a bad time to get your prescription drug information together. It’s a good time to update your information with any changes you’ve had to your medications.

Actions required on important birthdays – As we get older there are some important birthdays that needs special scrutiny and possible important action. The important date for Medicare is 65, that’s when we need to sign up and register for Medicare and decide whether we want to use Medicare fee-for-service or Medicare Advantage. Even if we are still working and have private insurance there are still actions that we must take.  Go to CMS.gov to find out about your Medicare benefits. There are other important birthdates, 62, 66 and 8 months to 67 (depending on your birth year), and 70. These are birthdays when you can elect to begin receiving Social Security (SS). There are a lot of variables that go into when you should begin taking Social Security. Before your 62nd birthday make an appointment to talk with a SS representative. In these times of the COVID-19 virus, it might be difficult to meet in person but don’t put off finding out all about this important benefit.

Inventory your medicine cabinet – Your birthday is a great time to inventory your medicine cabinet. It’s a good time to get rid of old medicine, both prescriptions and over the counter medicines. Many pharmacies will help you dispose of old medicine. Don’t flush it down the toilet or throw it in the garbage. We want to safely remove it from the environment. Now, I need to talk about a touchy but important topic. Many people suffer from drug addictions. We have all heard of the alarming increase in opioid addiction in our country. Unfortunately, a common way these drugs are obtained are by friends and relatives stealing prescription drugs from someone’s medicine cabinet. Having a medicine cabinet lock helps prevent this problem while also keeping these medicines from unsuspecting children. At the very least, monitor who has access to your prescription medicines.

Review your financial health – Being financially secure helps both our physical and mental health. You should review your finances with a trusted advisor. It’s up to you who you deem trustworthy, but it is a place to be very careful. Unfortunately, there are people out there who prey on older people and find ways to rob them of their savings. It’s always a good idea to have a third party, unconnected with your trusted advisor, independently review any actions with your savings. Due to the COVID-19 impact on the economy and investments it is especially important to review your finances. It’s also a good time to go over your non liquid assets, like property, jewelry, etc. A balance sheet to identify your net worth helps you understand your financial standing.

Inventory your passwords – This might seem like a trivial item but many people’s identity and ultimately their money are stolen because a person used common passwords or made access to their passwords easy. Find a smart computer person to help you set up a secure password vault and, after it is set up, change all of your passwords. There are vaults that only require you to remember one password to get into the vault, and they have all of your other passwords.

I’m sure you can think of other things that should be done at least once a year. I suggest creating a check list. Unlike my keys or my cell phone, my birthday is one thing I don’t forget. Use that fact to help you remember some things that may be even more important than your birthday.

Be safe and register to vote, Thair